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Preservation of Biological Material by Freezing and Thawing

  • John J. McGrath

Abstract

Mankind is fascinated with the relationship between living systems and low temperature. This fascination has stimulated both scientific inquiry and literary license. As early as 1683, Robert Boyle found that fish and frogs could survive for short periods of time if a fraction of the body water remained unfrozen.(1) Looking to the possible future potential of cryopreservation, science fiction writers have envisioned the day when biological systems as complex as the human body will be preserved reversibly by freezing and storage at low temperatures. But what is the present state of affairs as we stand between early scientific observations on the one hand and the dreams of science fiction writers on the other?

Keywords

Extracellular Solution Freezing Rate Slow Freezing Intracellular Solution Rapid Freezing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. McGrath
    • 1
  1. 1.Bioengineering Transport Processes LaboratoryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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