A Diode Laser Polarimetric High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Detector and Applications to Enantiomeric Purity Determinations and Enantioselective Reactions

  • David M. Goodall
  • David K. Lloyd
  • Zecai Wu
Part of the Chromatographic Society Symposium Series book series (CSSS)


The principles of operation of a polarimetric high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detector based on an 820 nm diode laser are discussed. Root-mean-square noise is 4 µ° (1 sec time constant), and detection limits are found in the range 0.10–2 µg dependent on specific rotation and chromatographic peak width. Determinations of enantiomeric purity have been carried out using achiral chromatography with dual polarimetric/absorbance detection. Applications to the pharmaceuticals ephedrine hydrochloride, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (in a cough linctus) and the agrochemicals paclobutrazol and fluazifop-P-butyl demonstrate the accuracy and precision of the technique and its potential in quality control. Determinations of enantiospecificity in enzyme and free radical reactions are reviewed. Polarimetric detection with chiral chromatography of complex reaction mixtures has allowed identification of enantiomers, and with achiral chromatography of near racemates has given enantiomeric purities to 0.1%.


Circular dichrOism Enantiomeric Purity Chiral Molecule Optical Rotatory Dispersion Single Enantiomer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Goodall
    • 1
  • David K. Lloyd
    • 1
  • Zecai Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of YorkHeslington, YorkUK

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