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The Study of the Self: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues

  • George R. Goethals
  • Jaine Strauss

Abstract

The 1989 G. Stanley Hall Symposium at Williams College sought to illuminate the breadth of current theoretical and empirical work on the psychology of the self. The chapters that follow amply illustrate the wide diversity of approaches: The authors discuss issues as disparate as self-awareness in primates (Gallup, Chapter 7); the frontal lobe’s role in the experience of the self (Stuss, Chapter 13); as well as psychoanalytic (Eagle, Chapter 3), feminist (Jordan, Chapter 8), developmental (Harter and Marold, Chapter 4), and cross-cultural (Markus and Kitayama, Chapter 2) theories of the self. In the present chapter, we would like to review some of the work, both classic and more contemporary, that has been done on the self before we address the contributions to theory and research represented in the present volume.

Keywords

Experimental Social Psychology Positive Illusion Freudian Theory Multiple Personality Disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • George R. Goethals
  • Jaine Strauss

There are no affiliations available

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