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A Clinical Method for Obtaining Pattern Visual Evoked Responses

  • J. Behrman
  • S. Nissim
  • G. B. Arden
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 24)

Abstract

Many attempts have been made to use the Visual Evoked Response as a clinical tool to investigate lesions of the visual pathways. The flash evoked response was soon found to be unsuitable, in this respect, because of the high degree of inter-individual variation and the fact that only a relatively gross lesion would produce a sufficiently large alteration in the response to be significant. Recently, pattern reversal without change in total luminous flux, has been found more effective than the brief unstructured flashes in evoking the visual cortical response. Many very elaborate and sophisticated techniques have been designed to produce this stimulus effect (Cobb and Morton, 1967; Regan and Heron, 1969; Halliday and Michael, 1970).

Keywords

Visual Acuity Optic Neuritis Contrast Ratio Screen Size Reversal Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

  1. COBB, W.A., H.B. MORTON and G ETTLINGER. 1967. Nature (Lond.), 216, 1123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. HALLIDAY, A.M and W.F MICHAEL. 1970. J Physiol.(Lond.), 208, 499.Google Scholar
  3. REGAN, D. and J.R. HERON 1969. J. Neurol. neurosurg. psychiat., 32, 479.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Behrman
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Nissim
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. B. Arden
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurophysiologyInstitute of OphthalmologyLondonEngland
  2. 2.Electrodiagnostic ClinkMoorfields Eye HospitalLondon, E.C.1England

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