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Treatment and Utilization of Apple-Processing Wastes

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Processed Apple Products

Abstract

Over 8,000 million pounds (36 million metric tons) of apples are produced annually in the United States, and about 70% of the crop is obtained from the states of New York, Washington, Michigan, Pennsylvania, California, and Virginia (Anon. 1984a). Approximately 45% of the total U.S. apple production is used for processing purposes and 55% for the fresh market (Anon. 1984b). New York State is the leading apple processor, producing over 20% of all U.S. processed apple products.

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© 1989 Van Nostrand Reinhold

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Hang, Y.D., Walter, R.H. (1989). Treatment and Utilization of Apple-Processing Wastes. In: Downing, D.L. (eds) Processed Apple Products. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-8225-6_17

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-8225-6_17

  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4684-8227-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4684-8225-6

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