Treatment and Utilization of Apple-Processing Wastes

  • Yong D. Hang
  • Reginald H. Walter

Abstract

Over 8,000 million pounds (36 million metric tons) of apples are produced annually in the United States, and about 70% of the crop is obtained from the states of New York, Washington, Michigan, Pennsylvania, California, and Virginia (Anon. 1984a). Approximately 45% of the total U.S. apple production is used for processing purposes and 55% for the fresh market (Anon. 1984b). New York State is the leading apple processor, producing over 20% of all U.S. processed apple products.

Keywords

Sugar Cellulose Fermentation Phosphorus Carbohydrate 

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong D. Hang
  • Reginald H. Walter

There are no affiliations available

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