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Objectives

  • P. G. Human
  • A. J. Dawson
  • Efraim Fischbein
  • Leon Henkin
  • Erich Wittman
  • A. W. Bell

Abstract

I have been concerned ever since I began to teach mathematics that a great deal of what is commonly taught and what is offered in textbooks provides a comparatively meaningless form of activity for pupils. They learn to perform certain computational processes, they perform algebraic manipulations, but those activities which would show them the purpose of mathematics are scarce.

Keywords

Mathematics Teaching Axiomatic System Reflective Thinking Deductive Argument Axiomatic Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston, Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. Human
    • 1
  • A. J. Dawson
    • 2
  • Efraim Fischbein
    • 3
  • Leon Henkin
    • 4
  • Erich Wittman
    • 5
  • A. W. Bell
    • 6
  1. 1.University of StellenboschSouth Africa
  2. 2.Simon Fraser UniversityVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Tel-Aviv UniversityRamat AvivIsrael
  4. 4.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  5. 5.Padagogisch Hochschule RuhrDortmundFederal Republic of Germany
  6. 6.Shell Centre for Mathematical EducationUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamEngland

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