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Some Common Aspects of the Formation of Nonoxide Powders by the Vapor Reaction Method

  • Akio Kato
  • Junichi Hojo
  • Takanori Watari
Part of the Materials Science Research book series (MSR, volume 17)

Abstract

As technology has advanced, needs for fine homogeneous powders have increased. Among many new powder preparation techniques, the vapor reaction method is receiving increasing attention as an important technique for producing powders of refractory oxides and non-oxides. Vapor-phase techniques are noted for their: (1) high purity powder products; (2) highly discrete particles or unaggregated powders; (3) ease of preparation of ultrafine powders with narrow particle size distribution; and (4) versatility for the direct preparation of metals, oxides and nonoxides.

Keywords

Carbide Particle Ultrafine Powder Supersaturation Ratio Vapor Phase Reaction Nonmetal Atom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akio Kato
    • 1
  • Junichi Hojo
    • 1
  • Takanori Watari
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of EngineeringKyushu University 36Fukuoka, 812Japan

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