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Alterations in Intrauterine Oxygen Tension During the Estrous Cycle in the Rat and Hamster and Its Regulation by Ovarian Steroid Hormones: A Comparative Study

  • David L. Kaufman
  • Jerald A. Mitchell
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 277)

Abstract

Previous studies have established that oxygen tension within the lumen of the uterus of the rat (Mitchell and Yochim, 1968a) and guinea pig (Garris and Mitchell, 1979) undergoes marked variation during the course of the normal estrous cycle. Such alterations are thought to result from the complex interplay of a number of physiologic and anatomic factors, including uterine blood flow, endometrial metabolism, and uterine structure. All of these determinants of intrauterine pO2 are directly influenced by fluctuations in endogenous ovarian steroid hormone levels. In order to gain further insight into the factors which regulate intrauterine oxygen tension, comparative studies have been undertaken in various species. The present report concerns observations made in the rat and hamster, specifically, the patterns of alteration in intrauterine pO2 observed during the normal estrous cycle and the effects of ovarian steroid deprivation and stimulation on oxygen tension within the lumen of the uterus.

Keywords

Oxygen Tension Estrous Cycle Ovarian Steroid Uterine Blood Flow Venous Oxygen Tension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Garris, D.R., and Mitchell, J.A., 1978, Temporal correlations between plasma ovarian steroid hormone levels and intrauterine oxygen tension in the guinea pig in: “Oxygen Transport to Tissue III.” eds. I.A. Silver, M. Erecinska and H.I. Bicher, Plenum Press, New York, p. 473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Kaufman
    • 1
  • Jerald A. Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy/Cell BiologyWayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA

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