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Online Measurements of SaO2, Ht and Hb Using a Micro Transmission Cell

  • E. P. Eijking
  • J. A. H. Bos
  • S. Armbruster
  • W. Schelter
  • W. Gumbrecht
  • W. Erdmann
  • B. Lachmann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 277)

Abstract

Oxygen saturation (SaO2) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) are important parameters for evaluation of oxygen transport in patient monitoring. Before the advent of noninvasive monitoring of SaO2 with pulse oximetry (Yoshiya et al, 1980; Severinghaus and Honda, 1987) intermittent sampling of blood gases was the only reliable method of assessing arterial oxygenation and probably still is the most frequently used method. While intermittent sampling is satisfactory under most clinical conditions, this method does not give any indication of the oxygenation status between two samples (Lam, 1987). As shown by Thorson and colleagues (1983), considerable spontaneous variation in PaO2 may occur in patients in the intensive care unit. Arterial hypoxaemia is often the cause of complications during anesthesia, resulting in for example neurological impairment and cardiac ischemia. The majority of incidents of severe hypoxaemia during anesthesia is the result of failure of oxygen delivery to the arterial blood. The common causes are mishaps reducing the inspired oxygen concentration, upper airway obstruction, misplacement of an endotracheal tube and hypoventilation (Knill, 1985). To prevent complications due to a failure of arterial oxygenation there is a strong need for continuous measurement of the arterial oxygenation status of the patient.

Keywords

Pulse Oximetry Oxygen Transport Oxygenation Status Cardiac Ischemia Online Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Bos, J.A.H., Schelter, W., Gumbrecht, W., Montag, B., Eijking, E.P., Armbruster, S., Erdmann, W. and Lachmann, B., 1990, Development of a Micro Transmission Cell for in vivo measurement of SaO2 and Hb, This volume.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. P. Eijking
    • 1
  • J. A. H. Bos
    • 1
  • S. Armbruster
    • 1
  • W. Schelter
    • 2
  • W. Gumbrecht
    • 2
  • W. Erdmann
    • 1
  • B. Lachmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of AnesthesiologyErasmus University RotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Siemens AGErlangenWest Germany

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