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Facilitated Transport of Oxygen Through Hemoglobin Solutions

  • Masafumi Hashimoto
  • Ryuji Hata
  • Takeshi Shiga
  • Akio Isomoto
  • Mitsuro Uozumi
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 277)

Abstract

In a previous study on the facilitated diffusion of oxygen by hemoglobin, we developed a new method using an image-input and -processing system composed of a 3-tube video camera and a digital image analyzer. With this system, diffusion of oxygen in hemoglobin solutions was observed through a microscope, i.e., a deoxyhemoglobin solution was put in a glass capillary tube, and the change in hemoglobin color as oxygen diffused from the open end of the tube was observed and analyzed quantitatively by using our computer algorithm to estimate the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin. Thus, we were able to identify the diffusion profile as resolvable into intervals of 5.5 µm for position and 2.9 sec for time. The experimental results provided new information about the oxygen transport (Hashimoto, et al., 1988).

Keywords

Oxygen Saturation Hemoglobin Concentration Oxygen Transport Diffusion Profile Oxygen Flux 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masafumi Hashimoto
    • 1
  • Ryuji Hata
    • 1
  • Takeshi Shiga
    • 1
  • Akio Isomoto
    • 2
  • Mitsuro Uozumi
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Physico-chemical PhysiologyOsaka University Medical SchoolOsaka 530Japan
  2. 2.Department of General EducationKinki UniversityHigashiosaka 577Japan
  3. 3.Osaka Prefectural Institute of Public HealthOsaka 537Japan

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