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Tumour Radiosensitization by Clofibrate and its Analogs: Possible Mechanisms

  • David G. Hirst
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 277)

Abstract

The oxygenation of radioresistant hypoxic cells in malignant tumours has been a major goal of radiation therapists and biologists for many years. Increased release of bound oxygen from blood to tissues was recognised as a possible way of achieving this (Siemann et al., 1979), and several other studies since then (Hirst et al, 1987 a, b; Siemann et al, 1986; Siemann and Macler, 1986) have supported this approach, showing that the affinity with which haemoglobin binds oxygen has an effect on the radiosensitivity of several experimental mouse tumours. Facilitated release of oxygen from blood to tissues can be achieved by reducing the binding affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen. Several techniques can be used in vivo to achieve this but they fall into two basic categories: the alteration of the intraerythrocytic concentration of the naturally occurring allosteric modifier, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) (Siemann et al, 1979; Siemann et al, 1986; Hirst and Wood, 1987), or the administration of compounds which are direct modifiers of haemoglobin/oxygen affinity, such as inositol hexaphosphate (Teissiere et al, 1985) or derivatives of chlorophenoxyacetic acid (Hirst and Wood, 1987; 1989 a,b).

Keywords

Radiation Oncology Blood Flow Change Tumour Blood Flow Radiation Research Tumour Oxygenation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Hirst
    • 1
  1. 1.CRC Gray LaboratoryMount Vernon HospitalNorthwood, MiddxEngland

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