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Manufacture of Yoghurt and Other Fermented Milks

  • R. K. Robinson
  • A. Y. Tamime

Abstract

Although yoghurt and other fermented milks can be manufactured on a small scale, and with modest levels of technology, the growing demand for products within the industrialised countries has lead to the installation of plants capable of handling thousands of litres of milk per day. As a result, sophisticated, automated systems of manufacture are now commonplace, and yet the basic approach to production is still reminiscent of the traditional procedures that have been associated with the peoples of the Middle East for hundreds of years. The reason for this linkage lies in the fact that success with any fermented product lies with the microflora and, in many cases, the microorganisms employed in a modern factory are basically derived from traditional cultures. Obviously, the manufacturers of starter cultures have become heavily involved with the selection of strains with special attributes, but at generic or species level, many of the bacteria enjoy a long association with the dairy industry (Tamime, 1990).

Keywords

Total Solid Starter Culture Fermented Milk Dairy Industry Casein Micelle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. K. Robinson
    • 1
  • A. Y. Tamime
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Food Science & TechnologyUniveristy of ReadingUK
  2. 2.Food Science & Technology DepartmentSAC—Auchincruive, The National College for Food, Land and Environmental StudiesAyrUK

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