Working Relationships in Analytic Group Psychotherapy

  • Karl Konig


By working alliance in psychoanalysis GREENSON (1967) means a relationship between therapist and patient, a real relationship as opposed to transference. A working alliance is not constituted just by the patient’s consenting to follow the rules of analytic therapy. The working alliance is a relationship between the analysing ego of the analyst and the healthy ego of the patient, partly derived from an identification with the analyst’s way of working, not with his way of participating in therapy. The patient should follow the basic rule of analysis and try to say everything which comes to his mind, whereas the analyst selects what he says submitting his utterances to the criteria of therapeutic advisability and efficiency.


Working Relationship Real Relationship Object Loss Analytic Therapy Aggressive Conflict 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl Konig
    • 1
  1. 1.TiefenbrunnW. Germany

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