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Mescaline and Phenothiazines: Recent Studies on Sub-cellular Localization and Effects upon Membranes

  • David N. Teller
  • Herman C. B. Denber

Abstract

Here we summarize some recent investigations of possible modes of action of two types of psychotropic drugs: psychotomimetics and phenothiazines, using studies with mescaline and chlorpromazine (CPZ), respectively, as examples. General reviews of their pharmacology have appeared, covering work done prior to 1962,(1) with reference to specific classes of psychotomimetic(2–4) or neuroleptic drugs,(5,6) but reviews of effects on biological membranes are less frequent.(7–13) [For reasons described below we have restricted our review of the effects of these drugs on subcellular organelles and the potential effects on central nervous system (CNS) protein metabolism to systems containing 50 µM or less psychotropic drug.]

Keywords

Erythrocyte Membrane Psychotropic Drug Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation Hydride Transfer Lysergic Acid 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • David N. Teller
    • 1
  • Herman C. B. Denber
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Division Biochemistry LaboratoryManhattan State HospitalNew YorkUSA

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