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Influence of Growth Hormone on Phenylalanline Incorporation into Rat-Brain Protein

  • S. Takahashi
  • N. W. Penn
  • A. Lajtha
  • M. Reiss

Abstract

Studies of the relation of endocrine glands to disturbed or retarded mentation were limited by the lack of suitable biochemical techniques and were consequently confined to behavioral observations. As in any other system in which the endocrine glands are studied, the biochemical status and competence of the target organs are of critical importance. In addition, the interrelationships among the endocrine glands themselves may alter the net metabolic effect on the receptor organs of the central nervous system, complicating any interpretation of behavioral response. During the last few years the methodology of brain chemistry has made such progress that, at least in animal experiments, one may begin to coordinate experimental results concerning endocrine function, brain metabolism, and behavior.

Keywords

Growth Hormone Endocrine Gland Brain Protein Specific Dynamic Action Intracellular Free Amino Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Takahashi
    • 1
  • N. W. Penn
    • 1
  • A. Lajtha
    • 2
  • M. Reiss
    • 3
  1. 1.Willowbrook State SchoolNeuroendocrine Research UnitStaten IslandUSA
  2. 2.New York State Research Institute for Neurochemistry and Drug AddictionWard’s IslandUSA
  3. 3.Willowbrook State SchoolNeuroendocrine Research UnitStaten IslandUSA

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