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Monocyte Activation by Immune Complexes of Patients with SLE

  • Maria Kávai
  • Attila Zsindely
  • Ildiko Sonkoly
  • Aniko Bányai
  • Gyula Szegedi
  • R. A. Harkness
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 141)

Abstract

Earlier we have observed1 that monocytes of patients with SLE had greater FcR activity than the controls. The expression of C3b receptors was equivalent to those of controls. In most cases the patients with SLE have a higher level of immune complexes (IC) in sera than those of the controls2. There is a correlation between the higher FcR activity of monocytes and the IC content of the same patients’ sera3. It is possible that the in vivo-bound IC are ingested by the monocytes, so they may activate the FcR function after their ingestion.

Keywords

Immune Complex Extracellular Enzyme Activity Monocyte Activation Rosette Formation Hungary Introduction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Kávai
    • 1
  • Attila Zsindely
    • 1
  • Ildiko Sonkoly
    • 1
  • Aniko Bányai
    • 1
  • Gyula Szegedi
    • 1
  • R. A. Harkness
  1. 1.Dept. of Pulmonary Disease, Div. of Medicine, Dept. of BiochemistryUniversity Medical School of DebrecenDebrecenHungary

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