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The Effect of Hyaluronic Acid on Neutrophil Function in Vitro and in Vivo

  • Per Venge
  • Lena Håkansson
  • Roger Hällgren
  • R. B. JohnstonJr.
  • Charles E. McCall
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 141)

Abstract

Defective neutrophil function is an established cause of increased infection propensity. In addition defects may also predispose to other diseases such as SLE (to be published) and reumatoid arthritis1 due to an impaired elimination of immune-complexes from the circulation. Even the control of tumor-cell growth2 or granuloma formation3 has been suggested to involve the activities of the neutrophil granulocyte.

Keywords

Latex Particle Neutrophil Function Impaired Elimination Intrinsic Abnormality Reumatoid Arthritis1 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Venge
    • 1
  • Lena Håkansson
    • 1
  • Roger Hällgren
    • 1
  • R. B. JohnstonJr.
  • Charles E. McCall
  1. 1.Departments of Clinical Chemistry and Internal MedicineUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden

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