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Formation of Superoxide Anions and Hydrogen Peroxide by Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Stimulated with Cytochalasin

  • Shigeki Minakami
  • Zeenat F. Nabi
  • Bernard Tatscheck
  • Koichiro Takeshige
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 141)

Abstract

Cyanide-insensitive respiration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes is induced by the D or E type of cytochalasins, a family of antibiotics which inhibits various cellular motile functions including membrane movement(Nakagawara et al.,1974). The respiratory stimulation is accompanied by the release of superoxide anions and the activated hexose monophosphate oxidative pathway but without any formation of phagosomes(Nakagawara et al.,1976). The cytochalasins D and E are ideal reagents for studying phagocytotic metabolic changes, because they inhibit endocytotic process at the same time. We are going to show the properties of the burst reactions triggered with cytochalasin D or E and compare the reactions with those occur during the ingestion of bacteria.

Keywords

Oxygen Uptake Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Chronic Granulomatous Disease Superoxide Release Radioactive Iodide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeki Minakami
    • 1
  • Zeenat F. Nabi
    • 1
  • Bernard Tatscheck
    • 1
  • Koichiro Takeshige
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryKyushu University School of MedicineFukuokaJapan

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