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Oxidative Damage to Lysosomal Enzymes in Human Phagocytosing Neutrophils

  • Ron S. Weening
  • Alwin A. Voetman
  • Mic N. Hamers
  • Louis J. Meerhof
  • Annet A. A. M. Bot
  • Dirk Roos
  • R. A. Clark
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 141)

Summary

During phagocytosis neutrophils from 8 patients with chronic granulomatous disease released 2–3 times more activity of lysozyme and beta-glucuronidase than did normal neutrophils. This difference was caused by the partial inactivation of these enzymes by normal neutrophils. The inactivation of granular enzymes depends on oxidative products and takes place mainly in the phagolysosomes. Myeloperoxidase is involved in this phenomenon.

Keywords

Lysosomal Enzyme Chronic Granulomatous Disease Pompeis Disease Lysozyme Activity Lysosomal Enzyme Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

CGD

chronic granulomatous disease

STZ

serum-treated zymosan

LDH

lactate dehydrogenase

MPO

myeloperoxidase.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ron S. Weening
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alwin A. Voetman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mic N. Hamers
    • 1
    • 2
  • Louis J. Meerhof
    • 1
    • 2
  • Annet A. A. M. Bot
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dirk Roos
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. A. Clark
  1. 1.Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory for Experimental and Clinical ImmunologyUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Pediatrics, Binnengasthuis, Academic HospitalUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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