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Genetic Aspects of Macrophage Activation for Tumor Cytotoxicity

  • Diana Boraschi
  • A. Mantovani
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 141)

Abstract

It is well established that macrophages play a major role in the resistance to tumors and infections1. In view of this fact, special importance is assumed by the understanding of the mechanism leading macrophages to the aquisition of cytotoxic activity for tumor cells or parasites. Recently, several studies on macrophage activation for tumor cytotoxicity provided evidence that development of macrophages with nonspecific tumoricidal activity is not the result of a single interaction between cell and activation signal, yet it requires the completion of a sequence of reactions2–4 .

Keywords

Macrophage Activation Recombinant Inbred Activation Stimulus Tumoricidal Activity Lymphocyte Proliferative Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diana Boraschi
    • 1
  • A. Mantovani
  1. 1.Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”MilanoItaly

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