Advertisement

Protection Guides for RF Radiations: Recent Developments in the U.S.A.

  • Don Justesen

Abstract

The history of U.S. standards for controlling human exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic (RF) fields is largely an account of efforts by Committee C95.1 and Subcommittee C95-IV of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Other agencies and institutions have been involved in standard-setting, but the ANSI efforts have left an indelible imprint on all such activities (see, e.g., Report 861 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, and the review2 by Elder and Cahill).

Keywords

American National Standard Institute Principle Validation Radiofrequency Radiation Pass Round Physiological Temperature Range 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    NCRP Report No. 86, “Biological effects and exposure criteria for radio-frequency electromagnetic fields.” National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements: Bethesda MD (1986).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. A. Elder and D.E. Cahill (Eds.), “Biological effects of radiofrequency radiation.” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Research Triangle Park NC (1984).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    ANSI C95.1–1982, “American National Standard: Safety levels with respect to human exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields, 300 kHz to 100 GHz.” The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.: NeW York (1982).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. A. Elder, “A reassessment of the biological effects of racliofrequency radiation: Non-cancer effects”. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Research Triangle Park NC (1987).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    S. Szmigielski, A. Szudzinski, A. Pietrazek, M. Melee, M. Janiak, and J. K. Wremble, Accelerated development of spontaneous tumors and benzopyrene — induced skin cancer in mice exposed to 2450-MHz microwave irradiation. Bioelectromagnetics 3: 179 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    A. W. Guy, C.-K. Chou, L. L. Kuntz, J. Crowley, J. Krupp, “Effects of long-term low-level radiofrequency radiation exposure on rats.” USAF School of Aerospace Medicine: Brooks Air Foree Base TX (1985).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don Justesen
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Research Laboratories (151)USVA Medical CenterKansas CityUSA

Personalised recommendations