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Ordered Disorder in the Aged Brain

  • Luciano Angelucci
  • Sebastiano Alemà
  • Laura Ferraris
  • Orlando Ghirardi
  • Assunta Imperato
  • Maria Teresa Ramacci
  • Maria Grazia Scrocco
  • Mario Vertechy
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 296)

Abstract

A perusal of experimental work on the neurobiology of brain aging shows that several investigations have been carried out on the theoretical bias that the aging process is quantitative in its nature, thus consisting in the progressive generalized weakening of biochemical (metabolic and specific) activities in the neuron, and leading to the impoverishment of brain functions which are typical of the species. In view of the perennity of the neuron, the factors underlying the aging process have been singled out in the deterioration of the nuclear function, especially with regard to protein synthesis, in reduced resistance to and increased formation of toxic wastes, mostly oxygen radicals, and consequent irreversible damage to enzymes, plasma membrane components, etc. Environmental impact on aging is believed to be exerted through these factors. The homogeneous character of these changes has recently been questioned, as in contrast to the ascertained prevailing selectivity of the changes for brain regions and cell types.1 Furthermore, the above interpretative frame of the nature and causation of the brain aging process disagrees with several experimental findings, notably the following.

Keywords

Muscarinic Receptor Dorsal Hippocampus Curve Area Cholinergic Synapse Slow Axonal Transport 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luciano Angelucci
    • 1
  • Sebastiano Alemà
    • 1
  • Laura Ferraris
    • 2
  • Orlando Ghirardi
    • 2
  • Assunta Imperato
    • 1
  • Maria Teresa Ramacci
    • 2
  • Maria Grazia Scrocco
    • 2
  • Mario Vertechy
    • 2
  1. 1.Farmacologia 2a, Facoltà di MedicinaRome University “La Sapienza”Italy
  2. 2.Institute for Research on Senescence, Sigma TauPomeziaItaly

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