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A Theoretical Analysis of Neuronal Biogenerated Magnetic Fields

  • G. A. Kitzmann
  • P. W. Droll
  • E. J. Iufer

Abstract

Theoreticians working in biomagnetics over the past decade have concerned themselves primarily with the interactions of imposed magnetic fields on protoplasm [1–6]. However, within this same decade, research has shown that living protoplasm is capable of producing biogenerated magnetic fields [7–11]. Recent advances in material sciences and instrumentation now permit quantitative measurement of biogenerated magnetic fields associated with nerve and muscle tissues. While in vivo measurements of AC magnetic fields on the order of 10-10 tesla associated with the human heart (first reported by Baule and McFee [10] and later confirmed by Cohen [11]) indicate the potential use of biogenerated magnetic fields, this paper will be primarily concerned with a theoretical explanation for magnetic fields that arise from isolated nerve bundles rather than for biogenerated magnetic fields in general [12]

Keywords

Magnetic Field Sciatic Nerve Axial Current Axon Diameter Magnetic Field Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Kitzmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. W. Droll
    • 1
    • 3
  • E. J. Iufer
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Ames Research CenterMoffett FieldUSA
  2. 2.Ames Research CenterState University of New YorkNew PaltzUSA
  3. 3.Ames Research CenterNASAMoffett FieldUSA

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