Advertisement

Introduction

  • J. L. McHugh
Part of the Lecture Notes on Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 10)

Abstract

Fisheries are as old as man: a ready source of food and an exciting form of recreation. They obviously developed in rivers and lakes, and in marine waters close to shore, where fishes and shellfishes were easily available and could be taken by hand, or with the simplest artificial devices. As local supplies became insufficient, fishing activity spread geographically, first up and down the shores of the ocean, then out to sea as crude rafts and canoes were developed. Early fisheries in deeper water used baited hooks attached to lines, and perhaps some surface species were caught with spears. Shore fisheries have remained important, because some important resources like oysters, clams and some crabs are animals of the shore zone and shallow, sheltered waters. Some migratory marine fishes like salmon and striped bass return from the sea to spawn in rivers. These anadromous species are particularly easy to catch when they congregate inshore. Other migratory marine resources move north and south with the seasons, and also inshore and offshore, so that sometimes they can be taken only in deep water far from shore, sometimes in coastal waters. They also move inshore and offshore with age, young fishes generally staying in shallow water, moving into deeper water as they become older and larger.

Keywords

Fishing Effort Maximum Sustainable Yield Purse Seine Commercial Catch Commercial Fisherman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Chapman, Wilbert McLeod. 1973. Food from the sea and public policy. In: Ocean Resources and Public Policy. T. Saunders English (ed). Univ. Washington Press, Seattle: 64–75.Google Scholar
  2. Crawford, Robert J. M., Peter A. Shelton and Larry Hutchings. 1983. Aspects of variability of some neritic stocks in the southern Benguela system. In: Proc. Expert Consultation to Examine Changes in Abundance and Species Composition of Neritic Fish Resources. G. D. Sharp and J. Csirke (eds). FAO Fish. Rept. 291, Vol. 2. FIRM/R291: 407–448.Google Scholar
  3. Edeson, W. R. and J. F. Pulvenis. 1983. The Legal Regime of Fisheries in the Caribbean REgion. Lecture Notes on Coastal and Estuarine Studies, 7. Springer-Verlag, New York: x + 204 p.Google Scholar
  4. Hayasi, Sigeiti. 1983. Some explanation for chagnes in abundances of major neritic-pelagic stocks in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. In: Proc. Expert Consultation to Examine Changes in Abundance and Species Composition of Neritic Fish Resources. G. D. Sharp and J. Csirke (eds). FAO Fish. Rept. 291, Vol. 2. FIRM/R291: 37–55.Google Scholar
  5. Hennemuth, Richard C. 1977. Some biological aspects of optimum yield. In: Marine Recreational Fisheries 2. Proc. 2nd Annual Marine Recreational Fisheries Symposium. Sport Fishing Institute, Washington, D.C: 17–27.Google Scholar
  6. Jensen, Albert C. 1972. The Cod. Thomas Y. Crowell Company, New York, New York: 182 p.Google Scholar
  7. Joyce, Edwin A., Jr. 1977. A summary of the second annual Marine Recreational Symposium. In: Marine Recreational Fisheries 2. Proc. 2nd Annual Marine Recreational Fisheries Symposium. Sport Fishing Institute, Washington, D.C: 207–213.Google Scholar
  8. McHugh, J. L. 1966. Organization and administration of fishery research in the United States of America. FAO Conf. on Fishery Admin. and Services, Rome, Italy, FAS/Cp66/11: ii + 39 p.Google Scholar
  9. McHugh, J. L. 1968. Recapitulation of impromptu remarks at closing session of Conference on the Future of the Fishing Industry of the United States. Unpublished.Google Scholar
  10. McHugh, J. L. 1969. Comments on Boyd Gibbons’ questions about the U.S. Fishing Industry. Unpublished.Google Scholar
  11. McHugh, J. L. 1978a. Historical fish and shellfish landings and trends. In: Fisheries. By J. L. McHugh and Jay J. C. Ginter. New York Sea Grant Institute, Albany, New York. MESA New York Bight Atlas Monograph 16: 1–79.Google Scholar
  12. McHugh, John Laurence. 1978b. Atlantic sea clam fishery: A case history. In: Extended Fishery Jurisdiction: Problems and Progress, 1977. Karen M. Jurgensen and Adele Porter Covington (eds). Proc. N. C. Governor’s Conf. on Fish. Mgmt. under Extended Jurisdiction. UNC-SG-77–19: 69–89.Google Scholar
  13. McHugh, J. L. 1983. Jeffersonian democracy and the fisheries revisited. In: Global Fisheries: Perspectives for the 1980s. Brian J. Rothschild (ed). Springer-Verlag, New York: 73–96.Google Scholar
  14. Ryther, John H. 1969. Photosynthesis and fish production in the sea. Science 166: 72–76.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Schaefer, Milner B. 1959. Biological and economic aspects of the management of commercial marine fisheries. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 88 (2): 100–104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Schaefer, Milner B. 1965. The potential harvest of the sea. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 94 (2): 123–128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Schaefer, Milner B. 1969. Fisheries productivity. School Science and Mathematics. Feb. 1969: 141–149.Google Scholar
  18. U.S. Congress. 1976. An Act to provide for the conservation and management of the fisheries, and for other purposes. Public Law 94–265, 94th Congress, H. R. 200, 90 Stat. 331–361.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. McHugh
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Sciences Research CenterState University of New York at Stony BrookLong IslandUSA

Personalised recommendations