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Human Inference

  • Angus R. H. Gellatly

Abstract

The psychology of human inference making is a broad topic that embraces a tangle of difficult and interrelated issues, and that includes contributions from a variety of disciplines, including, in addition to psychology itself, linguistics, logic, philosophy, sociology, and anthropology. Some idea of the scope of the topic can be gained from Braine and Rumain (1983), Johnson-Laird (1983), Kahneman, Slovic, and Tversky (1982), Nisbett and Ross (1980), and Sperber and Wilson (1986). Given such breadth, a chapter of the present kind can only attempt to deal with a few selected issues and approaches that are of contemporary relevance. Foremost among these will be the relationship between logic and thinking, the question of whether logic is descriptive of thinking processes or merely prescriptive of what is considered to be sound reasoning.

Keywords

Mental Model Human Inference Natural Deduction Inference Schema Syllogistic Reasoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angus R. H. Gellatly
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KeeleStaffordshireUK

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