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Abstract

There are several forms of learning, ranging from learning by being told to learning by discovery. In the former type of learning, the learner is told explicitly what is to be learned. In this sense, programming is a particular kind of learning by being told. The main burden here is on the teacher, although the learner’s task can be made more difficult by requiring that the learner understand what the teacher had in mind. So learning by being told may require intelligent communication, including a learner’s model of the teacher. At the other extreme, in learning by discovery, as opposed to being told, the learner autonomously discovers new concepts merely from unstructured observations or by planning and performing experiments in the environment. There is no teacher involved here, and all the burden is on the learner. The learner’s environment plays the role of an oracle.

Keywords

Decision Tree Expert System Classification Error Semantic Network Current Hypothesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Bratko
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Electrical Engineering, and J. Stefan InstituteE. Kardelj UniversityLjubljanaYugoslavia

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