Biology and Pathogenicity of Autonomous Parvoviruses

  • Günter Siegl
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

During the past ten years parvoviruses have attracted considerable interest. This is in part due to their unique molecular organization as well as to the fact that they provide an excellent experimental tool to study the replication of a small, single-stranded viral DNA genome and to probe into the synthesis of eucaryotic cell DNA. On the other hand, parvoviruses were shown to be associated with various economically important diseases of animals. At lease since the very recent world-wide epidemic of canine parvovirus enteritis they are no longer regarded as constituting a mere laboratory problem.

Keywords

Leukemia Diarrhea Interferon Osteosarcoma Sapphire 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Günter Siegl
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Hygiene and Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland

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