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Autonomous Parvovirus DNA Structure and Replication

  • William W. Hauswirth
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

The genomes of the autonomous parvoviruses are linear, single-strand DNA molecules of about 5100 base pairs (bp) and of minus polarity (complementary to mRNA). There are only minor length differences between parvovirus genomes of various mammalian species including those from mouse, hamster, rat, pig, and man. As will be discussed, genome similarity also extends to secondary structure, replicative intermediates, and, in a more limited sense, to the primary nucleotide sequence. Closely related parvoviruses of rodents additionally exhibit the ability to complement each other for several replicative processes (McMaster et al.,1981; Rhode, 1982), suggesting considerable functional conservation for both cis and trans acting elements. Bearing in mind that species variations do exist, it has been found thus far that all autonomous parvoviruses appear to share a common strategy for replicating their genomes. Therefore, although experimental data for a given structure or replicative process may exist for only one or two parvoviruses, they will be treated as characteristic of the entire virus subgroup.

Keywords

Terminal Sequence Complementary Strand Terminal Protein Minute Virus Viral Strand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • William W. Hauswirth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Immunology and Medical Microbiology, College of MedicineUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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