Advertisement

Mathematical Model of a Marine Hose-String at a Buoy: Part 1 — Static Problem

  • M. J. Brown
Part of the Lecture Notes on Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 12)

Abstract

Single point mooring (SPM) installations enable very large oil tankers to be loaded or unloaded without the need of deep water facilities. The most common system is shown in Figure 13.1 and comprises of a floating buoy secured to the sea-bed by chains. The tanker’s hawser and the surface hose are connected to a turntable on top of the buoy in response to the prevailing wind, wave and current forces. The oil is transferred from the buoy to the sea-bed manifold by an underbuoy submarine hose and then to the onshore facilities by a steel pipeline.

Keywords

Buoyancy Force Elastic Foundation Steel Pipeline Generalise Newton Method Equilibrium Depth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bernitsas, M.M. and Kokkinis, T., 1983. Buckling of risers in tension due to internal pressure: nonmovable boundaries. Transactions of the ASME, Journal of Energy Resources Technology, Vol 105, pp 277–281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Brady, I. et al, 1974. A study of the forces acting on a monobuoy due to environmental conditions. Proc. 6th Annual Offshore Technoloav Conference, Vol 2, Paper OTC 2136, pp 1051–1060.Google Scholar
  3. Bridgestone, J., 1976. Study of causes of kinking in floating hoses at Petrobras/Tefran terminal. Bridgestone Tyre Company of Japan. Report 6YMT-0011.Google Scholar
  4. Dunlop Oil and Marine Division, England, 1971. Offshore hose manual.Google Scholar
  5. Dunlop Oil and Marine Division, 1973. A study of forces acting on a monobuoy due to environmental conditions.Google Scholar
  6. Dunlop, 1976. SBM floating hose configuration. Central Research and Development Division, Birmingham, England. Report no. PR3408.Google Scholar
  7. Felippa, C.A. and Chung, J.S., 1981. Non-linear static analysis of deep ocean mining pipe. Transactions of the ASME, Journal of Energy Resources Technology, Vol 103, pp 11–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Graham, H., 1982. Newcastle model hose tests. Report for Dunlop Oil and Marine Division.Google Scholar
  9. Nordgren, R.P., 1982. Dynamic analysis of marine risers with vortex excitation. Transactions of the ASME, Journal of Energy Resources Technology, Vol 104, pp 14–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Saito, H. et al, 1980. Actual measurements of external forces on marine hoses for SPM. Proc. 12th Annual Offshore Technology Conference, Vol 3, Paper OTC 3803, pp 89–97.Google Scholar
  11. Timoshenko, S., 1955. Strength of materials, Part 1, 3rd Edition, pp170-l75.Google Scholar
  12. Tschoepe, E.C. and Wolfe, G.K., 1981. SPM hose test program. Proc. 13th Annual Offshore Technoloqy Conference, Vol 2, Paper OTC 4015, pp 71–80.Google Scholar
  13. Young, R.A. et al, 1980. Behaviour of loading hose models in laboratory waves and currents. Proc. 12th Annual Offshore Technology Conference, Vol 3, Paper OTC 3842, pp 419–428.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Mathematical StudiesThe University of LeedsLeeds, West YorkshireUK

Personalised recommendations