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The Structural Proteins of the Autonomous Parvovirus Feline Panleukopenia Virus

  • Jonathan Carlson
  • Keith Rushlow
  • Alistair Mcnab
  • Scott Winston
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 185)

Abstract

Approximately 80% of the genome of feline panleukopenia virus was cloned into the plasmid pBR322. The entire 3943 nucleotide sequence of the cloned portion of FPV was determined. This DNA includes the gene which codes for the structural proteins of the virus. Portions of this gene were expressed in E. coli as fusion proteins with bacterial proteins. Some of the fusion proteins were capable of raising neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs. Through the use of deletion mapping, monoclonal antibodies, and synthetic peptides, attempts were made to localize the portion of the protein responsible for raising these antibodies.

Keywords

Fusion Protein Splice Junction Small Business Innovation Research Small Business Innovation Research Program Mink Enteritis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Carlson
    • 1
  • Keith Rushlow
    • 1
  • Alistair Mcnab
    • 1
  • Scott Winston
    • 1
  1. 1.TechAmerica Research CenterSyngene Products and Research, Inc.Fort CollinsUSA

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