Protective Immunity Evoked by Synthetic Peptides of Streptococcal M Proteins

  • Edwin H. Beachey
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 185)


Protective immunity against group A streptococci is directed against the M protein fibrils on the surface of virulent organisms (1,2). Since this protein is often tenaciously associated with antigens that evoke toxic reactions or immunological cross reactions with host tissues (3), efforts have been directed toward the isolation and purification of protective epitopes of the M protein molecule that are free of harmful products. Recent studies of the immunogenicity of polypeptide fragments of M protein extracted from type 24 group A streptococci by limited peptic digestion (4) have been promising. The purified extracts lacked toxicity or detectable heart cross-reactivity but retained protective immunogenicity as demonstrated by vaccination studies in laboratory animals (4,5) and by preliminary vaccine trials in human volunteers (6).


Synthetic Peptide Protective Immunity Tetanus Toxoid Cyanogen Bromide Peptic Digestion 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin H. Beachey
    • 1
  1. 1.VA Medical CenterUniversity of Tennessee Center for the Health ScienceMemphisUSA

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