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Genetic and Developmental Analysis of Mutants in an Early Ecdysone-inducible Puffing Region in Drosophila Melanogaster

  • István Kiss
  • János Szabad
  • Elena S. Belyaeva
  • Igor F. Zhimulev
  • Jenö Major
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 16)

Abstract

Metamorphosis is a dramatic phase of the holometabolous insect life cycle, during which a reconstruction of the whole body morphology takes place. The transformation process involves degeneration and autolysis of most of the larval tissues as well as growth and differentiation of the adult organ rudiments. In the Diptera, which show the most extreme example of metamorphosis, both the initiation and the later processes are basically regulated by the steroid hormone ecdysone (Zdarek and Fraenkel, 1972). Metamorphosis probably involves stage-specific gene activation and repression, as exemplified by the ecdysone-induced puff-series on the salivary gland giant chromosomes of Dipteran larvae (Ashburner and Richards, 1976).

Keywords

Imaginal Disc Complementation Group Ethyl Methane Sulfonate Lethal Allele Adult Cuticle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • István Kiss
    • 1
  • János Szabad
    • 1
  • Elena S. Belyaeva
    • 2
  • Igor F. Zhimulev
    • 2
  • Jenö Major
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of GeneticsBiological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy SciencesSzegedHungary
  2. 2.Institute of Cytology and GeneticsAcademy Sciences of U.S.S.R., Siberian BranchNovosibirskUSSR

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