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Chromosome Aberrations and Sister Chromatid Exchanges in Persons Occupationally Exposed to Mutagens/Carcinogens

  • Helga Waksvik
  • Morten Boysen
  • Anton Brøgger
  • Olbjørn Klepp
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 40)

Abstract

It is generally accepted that some 5% of all human cancer results from occupational exposure to carcinogens. An increased incidence of respiratory tract cancer has been reported from nickel refineries in Wales, Russia, Canada and Norway1. Epidemiological studies from a Norwegian nickel refinery2 show that workers exposed to various nickel compounds for more than 3 years have a ratio of observed versus expected respiratory tract cancer of 13.9. Chromosome studies of humans exposed to nickel have not previously been reported.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helga Waksvik
    • 1
  • Morten Boysen
    • 1
  • Anton Brøgger
    • 1
  • Olbjørn Klepp
    • 1
  1. 1.Norsk Hydro’s Institute for Cancer ResearchThe Norwegian Cancer Society and The Norwegian Radium HospitalMontebello, Oslo 3Norway

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