Incision of Pyrimidine Dimer Containing DNA by Small Molecular Weight Enzymes

  • R. Grafstrom
  • N. Shaper
  • L. Grossman
  • W. Haseltine
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 40)


In Micrococcus luteus the incision event during repair of DNA containing pyrimidine dimers has been shown in vitro to be a two-step enzymatic reaction. The first step results in the cleavage of the N-glycosylic bond between the 5′-thymine moiety of the pyrimidine dimer and the deoxyribose generating an apyrimidinic site (Apy) and a thymine-thymidylate dimer attached to the DNA. The second catalytic step involves phosphodiester bond hydrolysis 3′ to the Apy site generating a nicked DNA with an Apy site at its 3′ terminus and the mixed thymine-thymidylate dimer at the 5′ terminus.


Micrococcus Luteus Pyrimidine Dimer Mixed Dimer Endonucleolytic Activity Apyrimidinic Site 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Grafstrom
    • 1
  • N. Shaper
    • 1
  • L. Grossman
    • 1
  • W. Haseltine
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryThe Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Sidney Farber Cancer InstituteHarvard UniversityUSA

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