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Caloric Intake, Dietary Fat Level, and Experimental Carcinogenesis

  • Roswell K. Boutwell
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 322)

Abstract

The percentage of calories provided by the fat content of the diet is a major public health issue. In order to lessen the probability of developing certain types of cancers, one of the most frequently recommended dietary changes is to lessen the percentage of calories provided by fat. The question that will be addressed herein is: What is the evidence for a specific role for dietary fat as a factor determining the incidence of cancer in laboratory animals? Because of the limitations inherent in epidemiology attributable to very large differences in life-style, human data on the role of nutrition on cancer incidence/mortality are often inconclusive.

Keywords

Caloric Restriction Caloric Intake Mammary Carcinogenesis Skin Carcinoma Mammary Tumor Incidence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roswell K. Boutwell
    • 1
  1. 1.McArdle Laboratory for Cancer ResearchUniversity of Wisconsin Medical SchoolMadisonUSA

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