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Isolation and Identification of Juvenile Hormones by Means of a Radioactive Isotope Dilution Method: Evidence for JH III in Eight Species from Four Orders

  • K. H. Trautmann
  • M. Suchý
  • P. Masner
  • H.-K. Wipf
  • A. Schuler

Abstract

So far three naturally occurring juvenile hormones (JH) are known: JH I, JH II and JH III. From the extracts of three species of giant silkmoths, Hyalophora cecropia (Röller, 1967; Meyer, 1968), Hyalophora gloveri (Dahm, 1970) and Samia cynthia (Röller, 1972), methyl (2E, 6E)-(10R, 11S)-10,11-epoxy-7-ethyl-3,11dimethyl-2,6-tridecadienoate (JH I) and the 7-methyl-analog, methyl (2E, 6E)-(10R)-10,11-epoxy-3,7,11-trimethyl-2,6-tridecadienoate (JH II) have been isolated and identified. Judy et al. (1973) extracted methyl (2E, 6E)-(10R)-10,11-epoxy-3,7,11-trimethyl-2,6-dodecadienoate (JH III) in addition to the known JH II from the culture medium of corpora allata of the sphingid moth, Manduca sexta. The JH III has also been found in an orthopteran, Schistocerca (Judy et al., 1973; Pratt and Tobe, 1974), and by Miller et al. (1974) in Periplaneta americana by using in vitro techniques.

Keywords

Insect Species Juvenile Hormone Desert Locust Leptinotarsa Decemlineata Reproductive Adult 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. H. Trautmann
    • 1
  • M. Suchý
    • 1
  • P. Masner
    • 1
  • H.-K. Wipf
    • 2
  • A. Schuler
    • 1
  1. 1.Dr. R. Maag AGDielsdorfSwitzerland
  2. 2.Socar AGDübendorfSwitzerland

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