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Enzymatic Synthesis of Juvenile Hormone in Manduca sexta

  • D. Reibstein
  • J. H. Law
  • S. B. Bowlus
  • J. A. Katzenellenbogen

Abstract

Following the successful elucidation of the structure of the Cecropia hormone by Roller et al. (1967), experiments designed to explore the mode of synthesis of this molecule in insects were immediately initiated. Much progress in our understanding of juvenile hormone biosynthesis has come from studies with excised corpora allata maintained in tissue culture supplemented with isotopically labeled precursors (Judy et al. 1973; Schooley et al. 1973; Pratt and Tobe, 1974; Tobe and Pratt, 1974a,b; Jennings et al. 1975). It was demonstrated that corpora allata in organ culture were capable of de novo synthesis of the hormones from small precursors such as acetate, propionate and methionine. Thus, the construction of the carbon chain, as well as its final modification into the epoxy sesquiterpene ester are metabolic properties of this gland.

Keywords

Juvenile Hormone Enzymatic Synthesis Mevalonic Acid Farnesyl Pyrophosphate Epoxy Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Reibstein
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. H. Law
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. B. Bowlus
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. A. Katzenellenbogen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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