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Paths toward Environmental Consciousness

  • Leanne G. Rivlin
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 11)

Abstract

Much of my life has been spent in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York. A graduate of its public schools and Brooklyn College, I went to Teachers College, Columbia University, for a PhD in developmental psychology that I received in 1957. While a graduate student I taught in the psychology department at Brooklyn College. After completing my degree, I was a research consultant on a 2-year study of creativity at Hunter College High School. With the termination of this project, I began my association with Bill Ittelson and Hal Proshansky in their environmental research that was based first at Brooklyn College, then at the Graduate School of the City University of New York in Manhattan.

Keywords

Public Space Environmental Consciousness Homeless Youth Ered Privacy Homeless Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leanne G. Rivlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Psychology ProgramThe Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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