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Environmental and Personality Psychology

Two Collective Narratives and Four Individual Story Lines
  • Kenneth H. Craik
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 11)

Abstract

I was born in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, on April 10, 1936. My parents, Margaret Conlon and Robert Craik, were first-generation Americans. My maternal grandparents had come from counties Cavan and Monaghan in Ireland; my paternal grandmother was born in Rosemarket, Wales, whereas my paternal grandfather, Henry Craik, was born in Tweedmouth, in the border district linking England with Scotland. My wife, Janice, also born in Pawtucket, and I were married in Providence in 1957; she earned her BA degree in English at the University of California at Berkeley in 1962. Two of our children, Jennifer and Kenneth, have received their undergraduate degrees from the University of California at Berkeley, while Amy is now beginning her studies at Reed College.

Keywords

Personality Assessment Environmental Perception Personality Research Personality Scale Personality Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth H. Craik
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Personality Assessment and ResearchUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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