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Formation of Cloud Particles from Large Hot Plume in Controlled Experiments

  • Pham Van Dinh
  • B. Bénech
  • N. Bleuse
  • J. P. Lacaux
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 3)

Abstract

For electrical production from nuclear energy, the existing cooling systems release their heat into the atmosphere as a combination of latent and sensible heat, such devices need a very important water flow. And the increasing consumption of electrical power implies new elaborating of plants more powerful but not heavy in water because it becomes more and more difficult to find appropriate sites near river or sea. For this reason, the forthcoming cooling tower will have to emit only waste dry heat. Such released heat over a small area can be intense. Thus there is legitimate concern about the effects of such heat source on natural atmospheric processes and the possible initiation of atmospheric processes which otherwise would not occur.

Keywords

Liquid Water Content Cloud Condensation Nucleus Cloud Particle Electrical Mobility Droplet Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pham Van Dinh
    • 1
  • B. Bénech
    • 1
  • N. Bleuse
    • 2
  • J. P. Lacaux
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de Recherches AtmosphériquesI.O.P.G. du Puy de DômeLannemezanFrance
  2. 2.Ecole Nationale de MétéorologieBois d’ArcyFrance

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