EPRI Plume Model Validation Project Results for a Plains Site Power Plant

  • Richard J. Londergan
  • Herbert Borenstein
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 3)


In recent years the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has engaged in an extensive experimental project, the Plume Model Validation (PMV) project, designed to assess the ability of existing atmospheric dispersion models in predicting ground level impacts from tall, buoyant sources associated with electric power generating facilities. The PMV project has four primary objectives:
  • Establish by statistically rigorous procedures the accuracy and uncertainty of ground-level concentrations predicted by available plume dispersion models.

  • Assess model performance over a range of meteorological and source conditions at a given site, and determine the transferability of plume model performance from one site to another.

  • Create and store extensive databases on observed power plant plume behavior and make these data available to the scientific community. Three terrain types are planned for evaluation: plains, moderately complex and complex.

  • Develop and validate improved plume models.


Electric Power Research Institute Plume Model Plume Height Cumulative Frequency Distribution Plume Rise 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Londergan
    • 1
  • Herbert Borenstein
    • 1
  1. 1.TRC-Environmental Consultants, Inc.WethersfieldUSA

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