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Influences of Subculturing Period and Different Culture Media on Cold Storage Maintenance of Populus Alba X P. grandidentata Plantlets

  • Young Woo Chun
  • Richard B. Hall
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 210)

Abstract

Continuous subculture is labor intensive and requires extensive culture space. Cold storage of in vitro cultured Populus plantlets could serve to alleviate the maintenance requirements of an established micropropagation system, as well as provide methods to facilitate germplasm conservation. In vitro cultured hybrid poplar, Populus alba X P. grandidentata could be stored at 4oC air temperature in darkness for 24 months and still recover suitable multiplication potential. Subculturing period preceding cold storage, plantlet condition, and culturing medium all had an important influence on survival at 4°C in darkness. A one-month subculturing period preceding cold storage was better than 0-month or 2-month subculturing period preceding cold storage. Shoot proliferation medium was better than rooting medium for long term cold storage. After 24 months storage, a 70% survival percentage was obtained with plantlets possessing 4–6 axillary branching shoots that were subcultured on shoot proliferation medium for one month preceding cold storage.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Young Woo Chun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard B. Hall
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of ForestryKookmin Univ.SeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of ForestryIowa State Univ.AmesUSA

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