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Approaches to Studying DNA Elements Associated with Light-Regulated Gene Expression in Conifers

  • M. A. Campbell
  • D. B. Neale
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 210)

Abstract

In many angiosperms light regulates the expression of genes coding for the small subunit of ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase (rbcS) and chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (cab). Upstream DNA sequences of the rbcS and cab genes, associated with transcriptional regulation, are reviewed and the possible role that these sequences have in conifer gene regulation are discussed. A DNA sequence associated with light-regulated gene expression in angiosperms, called box-II, was found in the upstream region of a larch rbcS gene. Using a double reporter system, we present a method that can assign a functional role to the box-II, as well as to other sequences in the upstream region of the larch rbcS gene. This double reporter system has potential in examining the upstream regions of both rbcS and cab genes for sequences that are associated with transcriptional regulation in conifers.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Campbell
    • 1
  • D. B. Neale
    • 1
  1. 1.Pacific Southwest Research Station, Institute of Forest GeneticsU.S.D.A. Forest ServiceBerkeleyUSA

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