Advertisement

Woody Plant Biotechnology: Perspectives and Limitations

  • M. R. Ahuja
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 210)

Abstract

Woody plant biotechnology has come of age. Basic techniques in the biotechnology of other plants also work in woody plants. Regeneration of plants, clonal fidelity, somaclonal variation, protoplast regeneration and somatic hybridization, gene transfer and molecular genetics, and preservation of germplasm are briefly reviewed. A number of questions, issues and problems in the application of biotechnology to woody plants are discussed.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ahuja, M.R., 1982, Isolation, culture and fusion of plant protoplasts. Silvae Genet. 31:66–77.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ahuja, M.R., 1984, Protoplast research in woody plants. Silvae Genet. 35:32–37.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ahuja, M.R., 1987, Somaclonal variation. In: Cell and Tissue Culture in Forestry, vol. 1., J.M. Bonga and D.J. Durzan (Eds.), Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 272–285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ahuja, M.R., 1988, Gene transfer in forest trees. In: Genetic Manipulation of Woody Plants, J.W. Hanover and D.E. Keathley (Eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 25–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ahuja, M.R., 1988, Gene transfer in woody plants: perspectives and limitations. In: Somatic Cell Genetics of Woody Plants, M.R. Ahuja (Ed.), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 83–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ahuja, M.R., 1988, Molecular genetics of transgenic plants. In: Frans Kempe Symposium ‘Molecular Genetics of Forest Trees’, J.E. Hällgren (Ed.), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umea, pp. 127–145.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ahuja, M.R. and Muhs, H.J., 1985, In vitro techniques in clonal propagation of forest tree species. In: In Vitro Techniques — Propagation and Long-Term Storage, A. Schäfer-Menuhr (Ed.), Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 41–49.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ahuja, M.R. and Muhs, H.J., 1989, Biotechnologische Verfahren zur besseren Evaluierung, Erhaltung und Nutzung von forstlichen Genressourcen. Berichte über Landwirtschaft, 201. Sonderheft. Verlag Paul Parey, Hamburg, pp. 414–422.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Aitkin-Christie, J., Singh, A.P. and Davies, H., 1988, Multiplication of meristematic tissue: a new tissue culture for radiata pine. In: Genetic Manipulation of Woody Plants, J.W. Hanover and D.E. Keathley (Eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 413–432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Amerson, H.V., Frampton, L.J., Mott, R.L. and Spaine, P.C., 1988, Tissue culture of conifers using loblolly pine as a model. In: Genetic Manipulation of Woody Plants, J.W. Hanover and D.E. Keathley (Eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 117–137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Attree, S.M., Dunstan, D.I. and Fowke, L.C., 1988, Plantlet regeneration from embryogenic protoplasts of white spruce (Picea glauca). Bio/Tech. 7:1060–1062.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Chaleff, R.S., 1981, Genetics of Higher Plants Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Dunstan, D.I. and Thope, R.A., 1986, Regeneration in forest trees. In: Cell Culture and Somatic Cell Genetics of Plants, vol. 3, I.K. Vasil (Ed.), Academic Press, New York, pp. 223–241.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Gupta, P.K. and Durzan, D.J., 1987, Somatic embryos from protoplasts of loblolly pine proembryonal cells. Bio/Tech. 5:710.712.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Kirby, E.G. and David, A., 1988, Use of protoplasts and cell cultures for physiological and genetic studies of conifers. In: Genetic Manipulation of Woody Plants, J.W. Hanover and D.E. Keathley (Eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 185–197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Larkin, P.J. and Scowcroft, W.R., 1981, Somaclonal variation- a novel source of variability from cell cultures for plant improvement. Theor. Appl. Genet. 60:197–214.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Ledig, F.T., 1988, The conservation of diversity in forest trees. Bioscience 38:471–479.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Melchior, G.H., Muhs, H.J. and Stephan, B.R., 1986, Tactics for the conservation of forest gene resources in the Federal Republic of Germany. For. Eco. Manag. 17:73–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Lloyd, G. and McCown, B.H., 1981, Commercially feasible micropropagation of mountain laurel (Kalmia latiflora) by use of shoot tip cultures. Proc. Int. Plant Prop. Soc. 30:421–427.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    McCown, B.H. and Russel, J.A., 1987, Protoplast cultures of hardwoods. In: Cell and Tissue Culture in Forestry, vol. 2, J.M. Bonga and D.J. Durzan (Eds.), Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 16–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    McKeand, S.E., 1985, Expression of mature characteristics by tissue culture plantlets derived from embryos of loblolly pine. J. Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 110:619–623.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Michler, C.H. and Haissig, B.E., 1988, Increased herbicide tolerance of in vitro selected hybrid poplar. In: Somatic Cell Genetics of Woocly Plants, M.R. Ahuja (Ed.), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 183–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Neale, D.B., Tauer, C.G., Gorzo, D.M. and Jermstad, K.D., 1989, Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping of loblolly pine: methods, applications, and limitations. In: Proc. 20th Forest Tree Imp. Conf. Charleston, South Carolina, pp. 363–373.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Neale, D.B., Ahuja, M.R., Alosi, M.C., Devey, M. E., Jermstad, K.D. and Marshall, K. A., 1991, Applications of high density restriction fragment length polymorphism maps in forestry. New Forests (in Press).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Purchase, H.G. and Mackinzie, D.R. (Eds.), 1990, Agriculture Biotechnology. Introduction to Field Testing. Office of Biotechnology, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Timmis, R. and Ritchie, G.A., 1984, Progress in Douglas fir tissue culture. Proc. Int. Symp. Recent Advances in Forest Biotechnology, Travers City, Michigan, pp. 37–46.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Russel, J.A., 1991, Advances in the protoplast cultures of woody plants. In: Micropropagation of Woody Plants, M.R. Ahuja (Ed.), Kluwer Academic Press, Dordrecht (in Press).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Russel, J.A. and McCown, B.H., 1988, Recovery of plants from leaf protoplasts of hybrid-poplar and aspen clones. Plant Cell Rep. 7:59–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Smith, D.R., 1986, Radiata Pine (Pinus radiata D. Don). In: Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry, vol. 1, Trees I., Y.P.S. Bajaj (Ed.), Springer Verlag, Berlin, pp. 274–291.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Thorpe, T.A. and Hasnain, S., 1987, Micropropagation of confers: methods, opportunities and costs. In: Proc. Tree Improvement-Progressing Together, E.K. Morgenstern and T.J.B. Boyle (Eds.), Canadian Tree Improvement Association, Ottawa, pp. 68–82.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Watson, J.D., 1990, The human genome project, past, present and future. Science 248:44–49.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. R. Ahuja
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal Research Centre for Forestry and Forest ProductsInstitute of Forest Genetics and Forest Tree BreedingGrosshansdorfGermany

Personalised recommendations