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The Rationale for Treatment of “Mild” Hypertension

  • Darwin R. Labarthe
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 84)

Abstract

This review is presented as a reference document for consideration of behavioral interventions in disease prevention, specifically in the treatment and prevention of so-called “mild” hypertension. As background to the review, the matter of defining “mild” hypertension and the evidence of its importance as a public health problem are addressed briefly. Then, the rationale for treatment of “mild” hypertension is reviewed in detail, first as to its scientific basis; second, by reference to the prevailing treatment guidelines; and, third, by discussion of some points of concern raised by recent commentators on the problem of “mild” hypertension and its treatment. In conclusion, by analogy with the evidence which has established the place of pharmacologic intervention in high blood pressure control, research requirements are outlined which must presumably be met if behavioral interventions are to become similarly established.

Keywords

High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Control Diastolic Pressure Blood Pressure Level Mild Hypertension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Darwin R. Labarthe

There are no affiliations available

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