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Primary Prevention of Hypertension a Program with Adolescents

  • Thomas J. Coates
  • Craig K. Ewart
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 84)

Abstract

Most discussions of blood pressure in adolescents begin with the proviso that hypertension is not a prevalent problem in adolescence and, therefore, does not require significant attention. We will argue the opposite, namely, that because blood pressure tracks and is associated with specific status (e.g., race, sex, socioeconomic class) and modifiable variables (e.g., diet, weight), primary prevention programs should be developed for adolescents. We will present a brief review of the data supporting the tracking hypothesis. Following this will be a discussion of (1) those immutable characteristics that place a person at relatively high risk for hypertension and (2) potentially modifiable behaviors which, when changed, might be useful in the primary prevention of hypertension. Finally, we will present available empirical evidence demonstrating the utility of specific programs for lowering blood pressure in adolescents.

Keywords

Blood Pressure Diastolic Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Primary Prevention Salt Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Coates
  • Craig K. Ewart

There are no affiliations available

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