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Medical Care Utilization and Self-Reported Health of Hypertensives — Results of the Munich Blood Pressure Study —

  • U. Härtel
  • U. Keil
  • V. Cairns
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 84)

Abstract

In the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), data on the utilization of medical care based on representative samples of defined populations are scarce. Medical care use has been investigated mainly by analyzing data from routine medical records, such as information for sickness funds, disability insurance, and general practices. The use of such data to study disease etiology is clearly limited (Keil, 1977). Furthermore, these data only provide information on individuals who have already been using medical care, so that a representative picture of the medical care utilization pattern of the general population cannot be obtained.

Keywords

High Blood Pressure Physician Visit Joint National Committee Untreated Hypertensive Hypertension Detection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Härtel
  • U. Keil
  • V. Cairns

There are no affiliations available

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