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Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry for Biological Compounds

  • Robert Hettich
  • Michelle Buchanan
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 269)

Abstract

The recent development of matrix-assisted UV laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry has made possible the ionization and detection of extremely large molecules (with molecular weights exceeding 100,000 Daltons) [1,2]. This technique has generated enormous interest in the biological community for the direct examination of large peptides and oligonucleotides. Although this matrix-assisted ionization method has been developed and used almost exclusively with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers, research is currently in progress to demonstrate this technique with trapped ion mass spectrometers, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTMS). The potential capabilities of FTMS for wide mass range, high resolution measurements, and ion trapping experiments (for ion-molecule reactions and MSn experiments) suggest that this instrumental technique should be useful for the detailed structural characterization of large ions generated by the matrix-assisted technique. We have recently demonstrated that matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption, with either 266 or 355 nm radiation, can be successfully used with FTMS for the ionization of small peptides [3]. The objective of this report is to summarize the application and current limitations of matrix-assisted laser desorption FTMS for the characterization of peptides and oligonucleotides.

Keywords

Laser Desorption NATO Advance Research Workshop Phosphate Linkage Pyrazine Carboxylic Oligonucleotide Dimer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Hettich
    • 1
  • Michelle Buchanan
    • 1
  1. 1.Analytical Chemistry DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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