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Neuroanatomy pp 540-560 | Cite as

The Problem of the Frontal Lobe: A Reinterpretation

  • Walle J. H. Nauta
Part of the Contemporary Neuroscientists book series (CN)

Abstract

The frontal lobe, despite decades of intensive research by physiologists, anatomists and clinicians, has remained the most mystifying of the major subdivisions of the cerebral cortex. Unlike any other of the great cerebral promontories, the frontal lobe appears not to contain a single sub-field that could be identified with any particular sensory modality, and its entire expanse must accordingly be considered association cortex. It should, perhaps, not be surprising in view of this circumstance alone that loss of frontal cortex, in primate forms in particular, leads to a complex functional deficit, the fundamental nature of which continues to elude laboratory investigators and clinicians alike. The purpose of this paper is, to review some aspects of this deficit in animals and man, and to inquire to what extent the consequences of frontal-lobe lesion can be evaluated in neurological terms.

Keywords

Prefrontal Cortex Frontal Cortex Frontal Lobe Inferior Parietal Lobule Amygdaloid Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walle J. H. Nauta
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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